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Corruption isn’t easily measured in Africa: Report

 

Without considering the broader challenges facing each African nation, corruption will remain a major obstacle to structural transformation and sustainable development throughout the continent, according to a new report by the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

“Transparency and accountability are essential requisites for ensuring good governance and, in turn, reducing corruption. Weak transparency and accountability in many African countries undermine the possibility of planning and executing policies, notably those related to structural transformation,” the report states.

Adam Elhiraika, ECA’s director for macroeconomics policy added the problem of corruption in Africa can’t be solved by Africans alone.

“To combat corruption, Africa needs good governance institutions and policies that are not exclusively domestic-oriented, since corruption in the continent is not exclusively the making of Africans,” he said in a release.

African countries and partners need to move away from perception-based measures of corruption and focus instead on approaches to measuring corruption that are fact-based and built on more objective quantitative criteria, according to the report.

In other words, real change can’t be achieved until practical recommendations and policy changes are designed and implemented for each African country.

The report, “Measuring Corruption in Africa: the international dimension matters”, is categorized into four themes: enhancing ownership and participation in development planning; improving transparency and accountability; building credible governance institutions; and improving the regional and global governance architecture.

To read the full report, see below.

African Governance Report IV

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Michael Sutherland-Shaw

Michael Sutherland-Shaw

Marketing Communications Specialist at FreeBalance
Michael works in the marketing and communications department following a career in journalism. Michael is currently learning Ruby on Rails and loves discovering new music.

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